Ready to Work – Not Retired!

Older but not retired

NOT RETIRED!

What happens when everyone seems to think you’re retired and you want to be seen as either actively running a business or looking for new employment?

EARLY RETIREMENT | LAID OFF | ILLNESS | PAUSE TO TAKE CARE OF FAMILY MEMBER

Some of us have been lucky enough to have taken early retirement (or perhaps not always so lucky) in our 50’s.  For me, that meant I was able to keep my medical benefits which allowed me the freedom to start my own business. I would get angry when people asked if I was retired when I was working so hard.

For many of us, retirement doesn’t mean we’ve stopped working.  We either can’t afford to or feel we have way too much to offer to quit, or perhaps some of both!

Or maybe you did think you were going to retire but circumstances have changed or you’ve changed your mind.

THE MESSAGE HAS GONE OUT

But if the message has gone out– perhaps even a message sent out to everyone at work (with or without your approval) – that you’ve retired, how do you let people know you’re still actively working or looking for new opportunities? LinkedIn can be a wonderful opportunity to get the correct message out there!

What can you do to show people you’re still in the game?

  • Update your LinkedIn profile, including making sure you have a recent photo. Yes, you may show a few more wrinkles – just make sure your photo communicates a kind of energy and warmth too!
  • Create a new LinkedIn headline to replace what was probably your former job title and name of the company. Use a job title that you will likely have when you’re employed again and/or an area where you want to work. Include some key areas of expertise.
  • Update your skills section.
  • Look at your “about” section and see that it tells your story and communicates your value.
  • Update your recommendations (nothing says “still active” like new recommendations.) Consider giving some recommendations. Your recommendation sitting on their profile is a free ad!
  • Consider removing at least some of your older work history. Is it relevant? Does it age you?  But perhaps it allow you to reconnect with former co-workers so don’t necessarily throw the baby out with the bathwater.
  • If you have your own business, add that to your profile, along with a free LinkedIn company page with a professional-looking logo (easy to create one for free.) If you don’t have your own business, consider adding a placeholder experience section, showcasing what you can do for another company.
  • Most of all, be active on LinkedIn. Comment and like other people’s posts.  Say congratulations and happy birthday.  Remind people that you’re still in the game.
  • Use your network.  Reach out and talk to people you’ve known over the years.  Talk to new friends and let them know what you do.

NOT GONE – DON’T BE FORGOTTEN!

I would love to talk with you about the benefits to you of having a great profile on LinkedIn, how to use it without it taking up more time than you can afford, what’s appropriate for you to share on LinkedIn, and how I could help you with your professional goals.  Please schedule a free 20-minute strategy consultation to see how I might be able to assist you.